Waterford Area Partnership CLG., Westgate Retail Park, Tramore Road, Waterford.

Tel: 051-841740, Email: info@wap.ie

WAP waterford

Equality

Waterford Area Partnership CLG

Equality Policy

 

Equality at Work

The Waterford Area Partnership CLG is committed to, its obligations under The Employment Equality and Equal Status Legislation Acts, 1998 and 2004.

The Waterford Area Partnership CLG recognises that in Irish society certain groups and individuals are discriminated against and are denied equality of opportunity.

Management aims to create an environment in which equality is promoted as a means of developing the full potential of everyone involved in the organisation.

The company is committed to examining and monitoring existing practices/procedures

and will make recommendation for change in relation to equality on an ongoing basis. .

The employment equality policy and legislative requirements will be included in

development and training courses. All management and employees, especially those involved in recruitment, training and appraisals will be fully briefed on employment equality legislation and its effect on company practices.

The organisation and its employees commit themselves to equality of opportunity and to eliminate all forms of discrimination under the terms of the Employment Equality and Equal Status Acts, 1998 and 2004. The Act describes discrimination ”as the treatment of a person in a less favourable way than another person is, has been or would be treated, in a comparable situation”.

The Employment Equality Acts 1998-2004

  • Promote Equality
  • Prohibit discrimination (with some exemptions) across nine grounds
  • Prohibit sexual harassment and harassment
  • Prohibit victimisation
  • Require appropriate measures for people with disabilities in relation to access, participation and training in employment
  • Allow positive action measures to ensure full equality in practice across the nine grounds.

Aspects of employment that are covered include:

  • Advertising
  • Equal pay
  • Access to employment
  • Vocational training and work experience.
  • Terms and conditions of employment.
  • Promotion or re-grading.
  • Classification of posts
  • Dismissal
  • Collective agreements.

The Acts apply to:

  • All employees

The legislation prohibits discrimination on the following nine grounds:

  • The gender ground: A man, a woman or a transsexual person (specific

protection is provided for pregnant employees or in relation to maternity leave);

  • The marital status ground: Single, married, separated, divorced or widowed.
  • The family status ground: A parent of a person under 18 years or the resident primary carer or a parent of a person with a disability;
  • The sexual orientation ground: Gay, lesbian, bisexual or heterosexual;
  • The religion ground: Different religious belief, background, outlook or none;
  • The age ground: This applies to all ages above the maximum age at which a person is statutorily obliged to attend school;
  • The disability ground: This is broadly defined including people with physical,

intellectual, learning, cognitive or emotional disabilities and a range of medical       conditions;

  • The race ground: A particular race, skin colour, nationality or ethnic origin;
  • The Traveller community ground: People who are commonly called Travellers, who are identified both by Travellers and others as people with a shared

history, culture and traditions, identified historically as a nomadic way of life on   the island of Ireland.

Discrimination – Discrimination has a specific meaning in the Acts. Discrimination is described as the treatment of a person in a less favourable way than another person is, has been or would be treated in a comparable situation on any of the nine grounds.

There are different types of discrimination covered by the Acts including indirect discrimination, discrimination by imputation and discrimination by association.

Discrimination is defined as the treatment of a person in a less favourable way than another person is, has been or would be treated in a comparable situation on any of the nine grounds which exists, existed, may exist in the future, or is imputed to the person concerned. The instruction to discriminate is also prohibited.

Discrimination is defined as the treatment of a person in a less favourable way than another person is, has been or would be treated in a comparable situation on any of the nine grounds.

  • Indirect discrimination – happens where there is less favourable treatment in effect or by impact. It happens where people are, for example, refused employment or training not explicitly on account of a discriminatory reason but because of a provision, practice or requirement, which they find hard to satisfy. If the provision, practice or requirement puts people who belong to one of the grounds covered by the Acts at a particular disadvantage then the employer will have indirectly discriminated, unless the provision is objectively justified by a legitimate aim and the means of achieving that aim are appropriate and necessary.
  • Discrimination by Association – this happens where a person associated with another person (belonging to a specified ground) is treated less favourably because of that association.